Re-dreaming Firefox (2): Beyond Bookmarks

June 3, 2015 § 17 Comments

Gerv’s recent post on the Jeeves Test got me thinking of the Firefox of my dreams. So I decided to write down a few ideas on how I would like to experience the web. Today: Beyond Bookmarks. Let me emphasize that the features described in this blog post do not exist.

« Look, here is an interesting website. I want to read that content (or watch that video, or play that game), just not immediately. » So, what am I going to do to remember that I wish to read it later:

  1. Bookmark it?
  2. Save it to disk?
  3. Pocket it?
  4. Remember that I saw it and find it in my history later?
  5. Remember that I saw it and find it in my Awesome Bar later?
  6. Hope that it shows up in the New Tab page?
  7. Open a tab?
  8. Install the Open Web App for that website?
  9. Open a tab and put that tab in a tab group?

Wow, that’s 9 ways of fulfilling the same task. Having so many ways of doing the same thing is not a very good sign, so let’s see if we can find a way to unify a few of these abstractions into something more generic and powerful.

Bookmarking is saving is reading later

What are the differences between Bookmarking and Saving?

  1. Bookmarking keeps a URL, while Saving keeps a snapshot.
  2. Bookmarks can be used only from within the browser, while Saved files can be used only from without.

Merging these two features is actually quite easy. Let’s introduce a new button, the Awesome Bookmarks which will serve as a replacement for both the Bookmark button and Save As.

  • Clicking on the Awesome Bookmarks icon saves both the URL to the internal database and a snapshot to the Downloads directory (also accessible through the Downloads menu).
  • Opening an Awesome Bookmark, whether from the browser or from the OS both lead the user to (by default) the live version of the page, or (if the computer is not connected) to the snapshot.
  • Whenever visiting a page that has an Awesome Bookmark, the Awesome Bookmark icon changes color to offer the user the ability to switch between the live version or the snapshot.
  • The same page can be Awesome Bookmarked several times, offering the ability to switch between several snapshots.

By switching to Awesome Bookmarks, we have merged Saving, Bookmarking and the Read it Later list of Pocket. Actually, since Firefox already offers Sync and Social Sharing, we have just merged all the features of Pocket.

So we have removed collapsed items from our list into one.

Bookmarks are history are tiles

What are the differences between Bookmarks and History?

  1. History is recorded automatically, while Bookmarks need to be recorded manually.
  2. History is eventually forgotten, while Bookmarks are not.
  3. Bookmarks can be put in folders, History cannot.

Let’s keep doing almost that, but without segregating the views. Let us introduce a new view, the Awesome Pages, which will serve as a replacement for both Bookmarks Menu and the History Menu.

This view shows a grid of thumbnails of visited pages, iOS/Android/Firefox OS style.

  • first the pages visited most often during the past few hours (with the option of scrolling for all the pages visited during the past few hours);
  • then the Awesome Bookmarks (because, after all, the user has decided to mark these pages)/Awesome Bookmarks folders (with the option of scrolling for more favourites);
  • then, if the user has opted in for suggestions, a set of Awesome Suggested Tiles (with the option of scrolling for more suggestions);
  • then the pages visited the most often today (with the option of scrolling for the other pages visited today);
  • then the pages visited most often this week (with the option of scrolling for the other pages visited this week);

By default, clicking on an Awesome Bookmark (or history entry, or suggested page, etc.) for a page that is already opened switches to that page. Non-bookmarked pages can be turned into Awesome Bookmarks trivially, by starring them or putting them into folders.

An Awesome Bar at the top of this Awesome Pages lets users quickly search for pages and folders. This is the same Awesome Bar that is already at the top of tabs in today’s Firefox, just with the full-screen Awesome Pages replacing the current drop-down menu.

Oh, and by the way, this Awesome Pages is actually our new New Tab page.

By switching to the Awesome Pages, we have merged:

  • the history menu;
  • the bookmarks menu;
  • the new tab page;
  • the awesome bar.

Bookmarks are tabs are apps

What are the differences between Bookmarks and Tabs?

  1. Clicking on a bookmark opens the page by loading it, while clicking on a tab opens the page by switching to it.

That’s not much of a difference, is it?

So let’s make a few more changes to our UX:

  • Awesome Bookmarks record the state of the page, in the style of Session Restore, so clicking on an Awesome Bookmark actually restores that page, whenever possible, instead of reloading it;
  • The ribbon on top of the browser, which traditionally contains tabs, is actually a simplified display of the Awesome Pages, which shows, by default, the pages most often visited during the past few hours;
  • Whether clicking on a ribbon item switches to a page or restores it is an implementation detail, which depends on whether the browser has decided that unloading a page was a good idea for memory/CPU/battery usage;
  • Replace Panorama with the Awesome Page, without further change.

So, with a little imagination (and, I’ll admit, a little hand-waving), we have merged tabs and bookmarks. Interestingly, we have done that by moving to an Apps-like model, in which whether an application is loaded or not is for the OS to decide, rather than the user.

By the way, what are the differences between Tabs and Open Web Apps?

  1. Apps can be killed by the OS, while Tabs cannot.
  2. Apps are visible to the OS, while Tabs appear in the browser only.

Well, if we decide that Apps are just Bookmarks, since Bookmarks have been made visible to the OS in section 1., and since Bookmarks have just been merged with Tabs which have just been made killable by the browser, we have our Apps model.

We have just removed three more items from our list.

What’s left?

We are down to one higher-level abstraction (the Awesome Bookmark) and one view of it (the Awesome Page). Of course, if this is eventually released, we are certainly going to call both Persona.

This new Firefox is quite different from today’s Firefox. Actually, it looks much more like Firefox OS, which may be a good thing. While I realize that many of the details are handwavy (e.g. how do you open the same page twice simultaneously?), I believe that someone smarter than me can do great things with this preliminary exploration.

I would like to try that Firefox. Would you?

Vous souhaitez apprendre à développer des Logiciels Libres ?

November 29, 2014 § Leave a comment

Cette année, la Communauté Mozilla propose à Paris un cycle de Cours/TDs autour du Développement de Logiciels Libres.

Au programme :

  • comment se joindre à un projet existant ;
  • comment communiquer dans une équipe distribuée ;
  • comment financer un projet de logiciel libre ;
  • qualité du code ;
  • du code !
  • (et beaucoup plus).

Pour plus de détails, et pour vous inscrire, tout est ici.

Attention, les cours commencent le 8 décembre !

Why Firefox OS matters to me

March 16, 2013 § 5 Comments

These days, everybody seems to be talking about Firefox OS. About how removing the barrier of the marketplace will make the world a better place, or about how HTML5 is so darn great, or about the fact that a gazillion constructors and operators are supporting Firefox OS. And that’s great, because Firefox OS is an impressively good product and deserves this attention.

However, all this craze is missing one feature that makes Firefox OS my choice of mobile operating system: I can write a playable prototype for a simple game, from scratch, in two hours.

Of course, this was a prototype, and completing the game took me a few more days of adding 8 bit graphics, optimizing, toying with the rules, adding difficulty levels, high scores, etc. But after just two hours, I could play the game on computer, tablet and cellphone, and decide where to proceed from here. This was both my first HTML5 game and my first mobile game, by the way. It is by no means an AAA game, but it is fun enough that I sometimes play it in the subway. By the way, did I mention that, once I was satisfied with this game, I could publish it in just a few seconds, simply by hosting it anywhere on the web?

Oh, and another feature: I wrote a quite usable comic book reader in the subway, while commuting from/to work. It took me a few days of commuting (three days, I seem to remember) to obtain a tool that works quite nicely. Due to screen size, I prefer using it on my Android tablet than on a cellphone, but that’s the wonders of HTML5 and Open Web Applications: I developed for one, and it worked for both. Did I mention that this was my first attempt at writing a web application that does file I/O or that uses the touch screen intelligently? I will try and finalize and release this application one of these days.

Now, other developers or users might not share this feeling, but this simplicity to start coding and publish and evolve a game or application is of tremendous importance to me. Because one day, I will have a child in age of playing video games. And for his birthday, I will have a chance to download a 5€ game from the Firefox Marketplace (or anywhere else), but more importantly, I will be able to build a game with his favorite characters as support cast and him as a hero. I hope he will love it. And I will not need to ask for permission.

If there is some application you want to develop, neither will you.

Fighting the good fight for fun and credits, with Mozilla Education

October 30, 2012 § Leave a comment

Are you a student?

Do you want to fight the good fight, for the Future of the Web, and earn credits along the way?

Mozilla Education maintains a tracker of student project topics. Each project is followed by one (or more) mentor from the Mozilla Community.

Then what are you waiting for? Come and pick or join a project or get in touch to suggest new ideas!

Are you an educator?

The tracker is also open to you. Do not hesitate to pick projects for your students, send students to us or contact us with project ideas.

We offer/accept both Development-oriented, Research-oriented projects and not-CS-oriented-at-all projects.

Are you an open-source developer/community?

If things work out smoothly, we intend to progressively open this tracker to other (non-Mozilla) projects related to the future of the web. Stay tuned – or contact us!

Asynchronous file I/O for the Mozilla Platform

October 3, 2012 § 18 Comments

The Mozilla platform has recently been extended with a new JavaScript library for asynchronous, efficient, file I/O. With this library, developers of Firefox, Firefox OS and add-ons can easily write code that behave nicely with respect to the process and the operating system. Please use it, report bugs and contribute.

Off-main thread file I/O

Almost one year ago, Mozilla started Project Snappy. The objective of Project Snappy is to improve, wherever possible, the responsiveness of Firefox, the Mozilla Platform, and now, Firefox OS, based on performance data collected from volunteer users. Thanks to this real-world performance data, we have been able to identify a number of bottlenecks at all levels of Firefox. As it turns out, one of the main bottlenecks is main thread file I/O, i.e. reading from a file or writing to a file from the thread that also runs most of the code of Firefox and its add-ons.

« Read the rest of this entry »

Appel à enseignants/intervenants

September 26, 2012 § 2 Comments

Pour Mozilla, l’année universitaire 2012-2013 est l’année de Firefox OS, l’année des Open Web Applications et l’année à laquelle la communauté Mozilla lance sa campagne de libération des téléphones et applications portables !

Nous avons besoin de vous pour enseigner les technologies des Open Web Applications aux communautés francophones.
L’objectif des cours est de former des étudiants ingénieurs ou équivalents aux technologies nécessaires pour le développement ouvert d’applications web ouvertes. Nous cherchons notamment des enseignements sur les sujets suivants :
  • JavaScript avancé (clôtures, événements, prototypes, itérateurs/générateurs, timeouts)

Déroulement des cours

Autant que possible, les cours seront donnés en français face à une classe de MIAGE de  l’Université d’Évry, où ils seront aussi enregistrés. Les cours seront mis à disposition de toute la communauté Mozilla francophone dans le cadre de Mozilla Education. Les documents correspondants seront eux-mêmes mis à  disposition sous licence libre sur github.
Si  vous ne pouvez pas vous rendre à Évry, mais si vous pouvez enregistrer des cours par vous-mêmes, n’hésitez pas à nous contacter. Nous mettrons vos cours à disposition du public francophone.
Si vous avez d’autres idées, n’hésitez pas à nous les proposer. En ce moment, nos capacités d’enregistrement sont limitées mais nous ferons notre possible pour enregistrer et mettre votre cours à disposition.

Pour participer

  • Si vous pouvez assurer ces cours (entièrement ou en partie), suivez les liens ci-dessus
  • Pour proposer d’autres cours que vous pouvez vous-même assurer, ajoutez la description de vos cours sur (cliquez sur “New issue”). Précisez si vous avez des contraintes géographiques ou besoin de matériel spécifique.

Et après ?

Notre objectif est d’étendre cette initiative hors de la région parisienne et surtout hors de France. Nous espérons notamment pouvoir organiser des cours en Afrique Francophone. La suite au prochain épisode !




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