The Future of Promise

November 19, 2014 § Leave a comment

If you are writing JavaScript in mozilla-central or in an add-on, or if you are writing WebIDL code, by now, you have probably made use of Promise. You may even have noticed that we now have several implementations of Promise in mozilla-central, and that things are moving fast, and sometimes breaking.
At the moment, we have two active implementations of Promise:
(as well as a little code using an older, long deprecated, implementation of Promise)
This is somewhat confusing, but the good news is that we are working hard at making it simpler and moving everything to DOM Promise.

General Overview

Many components of mozilla-central have been using Promise for several years, way before a standard was adopted, or even discussed. So we had to come up with our implementation(s) of Promise. These implementations were progressively folded into Promise.jsm, which is now used pervasively in mozilla-central and add-ons.
In parallel, Promise were specified, submitted for standardisation, implemented in Firefox, and finally standardised. This is the second implementation we call DOM Promise. This implementation is starting to be used in many places on the web.
Having two implementations of Promise with the same feature set doesn’t make sense. Fortunately, Promise.jsm was designed to match the API of Promise that we believed would be standardised, and was progressively refactored and extended to follow these developments, so both APIs are almost identical.
Our objective is to move entirely to DOM Promise. There are still a few things that need to happen before this is possible, but we are getting close. I hope that we can get there by the end of 2014.

Missing pieces

Debugging and testing

At the moment, Promise.jsm is much better than DOM Promise in two aspects:
  • it is easier to inspect a promise from Promise.jsm for debugging purposes (not anymore, things have been moving fast while I was writing this blog entry);
  • Promise.jsm integrates nicely in the test suite, to make sure that uncaught errors are reported and cause test failures.
In both topics, we are hard at work bringing DOM Promise to feature parity with Promise.jsm and then some (bug 989960, bug 1083361). Most of the patches are in the pipeline already.

API differences

  • Promise.jsm offers an additional function Promise.defer, which didn’t make it to standardization.
This function may easily be written on top of DOM Promise, so this is not a hard blocker. We are going to add this function to a module `PromiseUtils.jsm`.
  • Also, there is a slight bug in DOM Promise that gives it a slightly unexpected behavior in a few edge cases. This should not hit developers who use DOM Promise as expected, but this might surprise people who know the exact scheduling algorithm and expect it to be consistent between Promise.jsm and DOM Promise.

Oh, wait, that’s fixed already.

Wrapping it up

Once we have done all of this, we will be able to replace Promise.jsm with an empty shell that defers all implementations to DOM Promise. Eventually, we will deprecate and remove this module.

As a developer, what should I do?

For the moment, you should keep using Promise.jsm, because of the better testing/debugging support. However, please do not use Promise.defer. Rather, use PromiseUtils.defer, which is strictly equivalent but is not going away.
We will inform everyone once DOM Promise becomes the right choice for everything.
If your code doesn’t use Promise.defer, migrating to DOM Promise should be as simple as removing the line that imports Promise.jsm in your module.

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