Goodbye MLstate, goodbye Opa

September 6, 2011 § 6 Comments

Tides come and tides go.

Two years ago, I accepted to join MLstate, to take lead of the R&D group, and turn Opa from a promising early-stage demo into a world-class technology. And I am happy to say that we succeeded. Certainly, there are still many things that we would like to improve in Opa, but looking back on those two years, I am proud of the work we have accomplished, of the number of topics upon which we have pushed forward the state of the art, and even of many of the mistakes we have made, because they have expanded our understanding so much.

Now, after two years at MLstate, I am leaving. Our work is accomplished and I do not feel that I can contribute in any meaningful way to what MLstate has now become, nor that today’s MLstate can keep me excited and interested any longer. In the past few days, Opa has been featured on Lambda the Ultimate, on Hacker News and on Slashdot. Small and large high-tech companies have tried and enjoyed the technology. What better time than this to set sail and say goodbye to these two exciting years of my life?

As of today, I am not the Head of Research & Development, Chief Scientific Officer or Technological Evangelist at MLstate anymore. I will keep a distant eye on Opa, but I will not design or supervise its future versions. Mathieu Baudet, our COO, is replacing me as the supervisor for the development of Opa, while Adam Koprowski is replacing me as Technological Evangelist. Mathieu is a very intelligent security researcher and I am sure that he will impose a new style to the Opa team, and Adam is a bright and enthusiastic researcher/developer, and certainly the best person at MLstate to carry on Opa advocacy.

I would like to thank my University for supporting this foray into the exciting world of start-ups. I would like to thank our CEO for recruiting such a talented team. I would also like to thank Mehdi Ben Soltane, our CFO/HR director, who managed to do his job with a nice and welcome pinch of humor, even in the toughest of times. And mostly, I would like to thank all the R&D team: Maxime Audouin, Mathieu Barbin, Vincent Benayoun, Anthonin Bonnefoy, Raja Boujbel, Quentin Bourgerie, Sébastien Briais, Valentin Gatien-Baron, Louis Gesbert, Nicolas Glondu, Hugo Heuzard, Adrien Jonquet, Mikolaj Konarski, Adam Koprowski, Laurent LeBrun, Sarah Maarek, Grégoire Makridis, François Pessaux, Guillem Rieu, Pascal Rigaux, Norman Scaife, Rudy Sicard, François-Régis Sinot, Cédric Soulas, Quickie Squeaky, Hugo Venturini, Frédéric Ye, and all our successive generations of interns[1]: you are the best team I have ever had the chance to join, it really was an honor and a pleasure working with you all and I hope that those among you who have chosen to remain in MLstate have as much fun working under Mathieu’s leadership as I had working with you all.

Time to set sail! My next missive should arrive from the next port.

[1] Sorry, I do not have the list of interns at hand. But do not worry, I enjoyed working with you, too :)

Opa on Lambda the Ultimate (and now Slashdot)

August 28, 2011 § Leave a comment

There is a nice discussion on Opa on Lambda the Ultimate forums. If you are not familiar with Lambda the Ultimate, know that this is the place for discussing new and exotic programming languages and programming concepts, so the simple fact of seeing a thread on LtU is something of an honor for us.

See also

Edit Added the Slashdot thread.

Edit Gasp, Slashdot is down. Hey, GeekNet, if you need a scalable programming language for the next version of Slashcode, just ping us :)

Unbreaking Scalable Web Development, One Loc at a Time

May 23, 2011 § 18 Comments

The Opa platform was created to address the problem of developing secure, scalable web applications. Opa is a commercially supported open-source programming language designed for web, concurrency, distribution, scalability and security. We have entered closed beta and the code will be released soon on http://opalang.org, as an Owasp project .

If you are a true coder, sometimes, you meet a problem so irritating, or a solution so clumsy, that challenging it is a matter of engineering pride. I assume that many of the greatest technologies we have today were born from such challenges, from OpenGL to the web itself. The pain of pure LAMP-based web development begat Ruby on Rails, Django or Node.js, as well as the current NoSQL generation. Similarly, the pains of scalable large system development with raw tools begat Erlang, Map/Reduce or Project Voldemort.

Opa was born from the pains of developing scalable, secure web applications. Because, for all the merits of existing solutions, we just knew that we could do much, much better.

Unsurprisingly, getting there was quite a challenge. Between the initial idea and an actual platform lay blood, sweat and code, many experiments and failed prototypes, but finally, we got there. After years of development and real-scale testing, we are now getting ready to release the result.

The parents are proud to finally introduce Opa. « Read the rest of this entry »

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