Copying streams asynchronously

October 18, 2013 § Leave a comment

In the Mozilla Platform, I/O is largely about streams. Copying streams is a rather common activity, e.g. for the purpose of downloading files, decompressing archives, saving decoded images, etc. As usual, doing any I/O on the main thread is a very bad idea, so the recommended manner of copying streams is to use one of the asynchronous string copy APIs provided by the platform: NS_AsyncCopy (in C++) and NetUtil.asyncCopy (in JavaScript). I have recently audited both to ascertain whether they accidentally cause main thread I/O and here are the results of my investigations.

In C++

What NS_AsyncCopy does

NS_AsyncCopy is a well-designed (if a little complex) API. It copies the full contents of an input stream into an output stream, then closes both. NS_AsyncCopy can be called with both synchronous and asynchronous streams. By default, all operations take place off the main thread, which is exactly what is needed.

In particular, even when used with the dreaded Safe File Output Stream, NS_AsyncCopy will perform every piece of I/O out of the main thread.

The default setting of reading data by chunks of 4kb might not be appropriate to all data, as it may cause too much I/O, in particular if you are reading a small file. There is no obvious way for clients to detect the right setting without causing file I/O, so it might be a good idea to eventually extend NS_AsyncCopy to autodetect the “right” chunk size for simple cases.

Bottom line: NS_AsyncCopy is not perfect but it is quite good and it does not cause main thread I/O.

Limitations

NS_AsyncCopy will, of course, not remove main thread I/O that takes place externally. If you open a stream from the main thread, this can cause main thread I/O. In particular, file streams should really be opened with flag DEFER_OPEN flag. Other streams, such as nsIJARInputStream do not support any form of deferred opening (bug 928329), and will cause main thread I/O when they are opened.

While NS_AsyncCopy does only off main thread I/O, using a Safe File Output Stream will cause a Flush. The Flush operation is very expensive for the whole system, even when executed off the main thread. For this reason, Safe File Output Stream is generally not the right choice of output stream (bug 928321).

Finally, if you only want to copy a file, prefer OS.File.copy (if you can call JS). This function is simpler, entirely off main thread, and supports OS-specific accelerations.

In JavaScript

What NetUtil.asyncCopy does

NetUtil.asyncCopy is a utility method that lets JS clients call NS_AsyncCopy. Theoretically, it should have the same behavior. However, some oddities make its performance lower.

As NS_AsyncCopy requires one of its streams to be buffered, NetUtil.asyncCopy calls nsIIOUtil::inputStreamIsBuffered and nsIIOUtil::outputStreamIsBuffered. These methods detect whether a stream is buffered by attempting to perform buffered I/O. Whenever they succeed, this causes main thread I/O (bug 928340).

Limitations

Generally speaking, NetUtil.asyncCopy has the same limitations as NS_AsyncCopy. In particular, in any case in which you can replace NetUtil.asyncCopy with OS.File.copy, you should pick the latter, which is both simpler and faster.

Also, NetUtil.asyncCopy cannot read directly from a Zip file (bug 927366).

Finally, NetUtil.asyncCopy does not fit the “modern” way of writing asynchronous code on the Mozilla Platform (bug 922298).

Helping out

We need to fix a few bugs to improve the performance of asynchronous copy. If you wish to help, please do not hesitate to pick any of the bugs listed above and get in touch with me.

Announcing Project Async & Responsive

April 10, 2013 § 24 Comments

tl;dr

Project Snappy has been retired and replaced by several smaller projects, including Async & Responsive. The objective of this project is to improve the responsiveness of Firefox and the Mozilla Platform by converting key components to make them asynchronous and, wherever possible, to move them off the main thread.

The setting

Firefox and other Mozilla applications are great products, in particular in terms of performance. They are based on an extremely fast rendering engine, Gecko, and its companion JavaScript engine, which in addition to being the richest JS engine around, is also, these days, quite possibly the fastest. What is not so great, unfortunately, is that despite these great core performances, Mozilla applications have often been perceived as slow and sluggish.

Project Snappy was formed about 18 months ago to focus the effort by Mozilla developers to fight this perceived sluggishness. During this period, we have made tremendous progress, thanks to the commitment of everyone involved. Indeed, most of the long-term objectives of Snappy have been reached already. We have therefore decided to retire project Snappy, in favor of both a larger project Performance, and several sub-projects focusing on distinct aspects of Performance.

Let me introduce Asynchronous & Responsive [1], one of the sub-projects of Performance.

Project outline

Despite considerable progress, much of Firefox still behaves as a single-threaded application. Most services and components are initialized sequentially in the main thread, run in the main thread, are shutdown sequentially in the main thread. Also, most add-ons execute essentially in the main thread. As a consequence, any long-lived task can disrupt the user experience.

There are historical reasons for this, but in most cases, there is not deep blocker that would prevent us from rewriting services. Project Asynchronous & Responsive is now starting to support and focus the ongoing effort to get rid of main thread services and components, both in platform code and in add-on code, for the betterment of all Mozillakind.

This entails:

  • identifying blockers that prevent platform and add-on developers from deploying their code on non-main threads (generally, worker threads);
  • helping platform and add-on developers transition their code off-main thread;
  • actually transitioning some of our services and components off the main thread.

Please note that we have no intention of working on the JavaScript VM, on DOM or Graphics. These teams already have dedicated developers working on moving things off the main thread.

Following our progress

As I am the tech lead of this project, you will find more information on this blog, under category Performance.

I will try and post updates every second week.

[1] If you have an idea of a nicer name that does not sound too much like “Snappy”, we are interested :) Marxist jokes about Workers might or might not be accepted.

Beautiful Off Main Thread File I/O

October 18, 2012 § 7 Comments

Now that the main work on Off Main Thread File I/O for Firefox is complete, I have finally found some time to test-drive the combination of Task.js and OS.File. Let me tell you one thing: it rocks!

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Introducing JavaScript native file management

December 6, 2011 § 28 Comments

Summary

The Mozilla Platform keeps improving: JavaScript native file management is an undergoing work to provide a high-performance JavaScript-friendly API to manipulate the file system.

The Mozilla Platform, JavaScript and Files

The Mozilla Platform is the application development framework behind Firefox, Thunderbird, Instantbird, Camino, Songbird and a number of other applications.

While the performance-critical components of the Mozilla Platform are developed in C/C++, an increasing number of components and add-ons are implemented in pure JavaScript. While JavaScript cannot hope to match the speed or robustness of C++ yet (edit: at least not on all aspects), the richness and dynamism of the language permit the creation of extremely flexible and developer-friendly APIs, as well as quick prototyping and concise implementation of complex algorithms without the fear of memory errors and with features such as higher-level programming, asynchronous programming and now clean and efficient multi-threading. If you combine this with the impressive speed-ups experienced by JavaScript in the recent years, it is easy to understand why the language has become a key element in the current effort to make the Mozilla Platform and its add-ons faster and more responsive at all levels.

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